Two Indian nationals were among the three people murdered in a suspected drone attack in Abu Dhabi

According to authorities, a probable drone strike may have caused an explosion that hit three oil tankers in Abu Dhabi on Monday, as well as a fire at an extension of Abu Dhabi International Airport that killed three people and injured six others.

According to UAE authorities, two Indians were among the three people killed in a possible drone attack that resulted in an explosion that hit three oil tankers in Abu Dhabi and a fire at an extension of Abu Dhabi International Airport on Monday, killing three people and injuring six others, police said.

Two Indians and one Pakistani were among the fatalities, according to Abu Dhabi police. It did not name the injured, who authorities said had slight to moderate injuries.

An investigation was launched, according to the police.

While Abu Dhabi police did not immediately name any suspects in the alleged attack, Yemen’s Houthi rebels claimed responsibility for an attack on the UAE without providing any details. The Houthis, who are backed by Iran, have claimed responsibility for multiple strikes that Emirati officials later disputed.

The event occurred while Yemen’s years-long conflict continues, and an Emirati-flagged warship was just captured by the Houthis. This is despite the fact that Abu Dhabi has mostly withdrawn its national forces from the crisis tearing apart the Arab world’s poorest country while continuing to back local militias.

Preliminary investigations by Abu Dhabi police revealed the discovery of small flying objects, perhaps drones, that dropped in the two sites and may have caused the explosion and fire. They stated that the occurrences caused no serious damage but did not provide any other information.

The event occurred while Yemen’s years-long conflict continues, and an Emirati-flagged warship was just captured by the Houthis. This is despite the fact that Abu Dhabi has mostly withdrawn its national forces from the crisis tearing apart the Arab world’s poorest country while continuing to back local militias.

Since early 2015, the UAE has been at war in Yemen and was a significant part of the Saudi-led coalition that commenced airstrikes against the Iranian-backed Houthis after they overran Yemen’s capital and deposed the internationally recognised government.

Despite the fact that the UAE has reduced the number of troops on the ground, it remains actively involved in the conflict and supports crucial militias battling the Houthis. In Yemen, it also works closely with the US in counter-terrorism operations.

The Houthis have been under fire in recent weeks and have suffered substantial losses as Yemeni forces, backed by the UAE, have forced the rebels back in the country’s crucial southern and central districts.

Yemen’s government-aligned forces recaptured the whole southern province of Shabwa from the Houthis earlier this month, helped by the UAE-backed Giants Brigades and with the backing of Saudi airstrikes.

The event occurs while South Korean President Moon Jae-in travels to the United Arab Emirates. The two countries reportedly negotiated a preliminary contract worth $3.5 billion to supply mid-range South Korean surface-to-air missiles to the UAE during the president’s meeting with Emirati Prime Minister and Dubai ruler Sheikh Mohammed bin Rashid Al Maktoum on Sunday.

Previous attacks on Abu Dhabi’s airport and the emirate’s Barakah nuclear power station have been claimed by the Houthis, which Emirati officials have disputed in the past.

Throughout the battle, the Houthis have deployed bomb-laden drones to launch crude and imprecise assaults against Saudi Arabia and the UAE. The group has also employed booby-trapped boats to assault critical maritime routes and launched missiles against Saudi airports, oil infrastructure, and pipelines.

Although some of these assaults resulted in civilian casualties in Saudi Arabia, the vast majority of civilian deaths have occurred in Yemen. In Yemen, the war has killed 130,000 people, both civilians, and fighters, and has exacerbated starvation and famine across the country.

 




Readers like you help support The Tech Outlook. When you make a purchase using links on our site, we may earn an affiliate commission. We cannot guarantee the Product information shown is 100% accurate and we advise you to check the product listing on the original manufacturer website. Thetechoutlook is not responsible for price changes carried out by retailers. The discounted price or deal mentioned in this item was available at the time of writing and may be subject to time restrictions and/or limited unit availability. Amazon and the Amazon logo are trademarks of Amazon.com, Inc. or its affiliates Read More

Advertisement

This website uses cookies to improve your experience. We'll assume you're ok with this, but you can opt-out if you wish. Accept Read More