An Unidentified Hacktivist has hacked the servers of the Cayman National Bank and Trust

As per the sources, we came to know that an unidentified hacktivist called Phineas Fisher, has hacked the servers of the Cayman National Bank and Trust. This bank was termed the Isle of Man. The hacktivist has published the copies of the server on the internet with a file name known as Hack Back .txt file, titled by the author: “A DIY guide to robbing banks.”

An Unidentified Hacktivist has hacked and published the copies of the servers of the Cayman National Bank and Trust

The identity of Phineas Fisher is currently unknown. This hacktivist group was termed a self-proclaimed anarchist revolutionary. Typically, their attacks are followed by a statement providing details about the breach, how-to technical knowledge, ASCII art, poetry, and leftist and anarchist ideology. Fisher promised hackers a prize of up to US$100,000 for successful hacktivism in 2019, according to reports, and claimed to have paid out US$10,000 the next year.

Coming to the published data, as per the research, the data contained the analysis of the locations of over 1,400 client accounts. Global Witness looked into the Isle of Man’s rising reputation as a tax shelter for European private aircraft purchasers. Global Witness concluded that the Sherwood data demonstrates that government regulators have an overly intimate relationship with financial forces and do not behave as keepers of the public interest.

Talking about the aftermath of this situation, we also came to know from the sources that Belgium’s finance minister declared that it was looking into this data set for tax evasion. The Brookings Institute’s economist Matthew Collin issued the paper What lies beneath: Leaked account data reveals how the wealthy use offshore banking.

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